Fall: Dark Evening Rides, Colorful Trail Days

As the Sun sets earlier in the fall, my after work rides get a bit darker.

I love night riding, especially when I’m in quiet, low traffic areas where I can ride without a headlight. There’s just something about being out with nothing but moonlight (Or less sometimes!) lighting the path. It’s liberating.

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At the same time, there’s something about riding singletrack at night, with nothing but a headlight. What you see is so limited. It’s a big world around you, and you can only see what’s in your beam, and nothing outside it. Scary, but exciting!

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With the changing leaves, the trail days get colorful. It’s magical being out in the woods working on the trails, with the trees changing colors and dropping their leaves. Fall really is one of my favorite times to be out there.

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Brand new trail with a view!
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It’s hard work building new trail. Sorry, big mahogany bush…
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I did save a couple big pieces of it to make something out of, so it’s not wasted.

Winter’s coming though… The Peaks have some snow on them!

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Fall Colors in the Inner Basin – 2018

It’s my favorite time of year to be riding a bike. It’s not too hot, it’s not too cold, the wind is reasonably tame most days, and, best of all, the leaves are changing color.

A ride I do every year, is a ride up Waterline Road, to the Inner Basin of the San Francisco Peaks. It’s a ride that I think some people have come to expect me to do every year. It’s a long ride, with almost a vertical mile of total climbing, but I look forward to it, even after the Schultz Fire burned that side of the mountain. It’s been interesting to see the ongoing recovery. It’s also a ride that I typically do in it’s entirety only once a year. It’s just not the same without the yellows and reds and oranges.

We start off riding from the house to Schultz Pass, where the bottom of Waterline Road is. We then go up, under the Dragonspine, and wind along the ridges of the east side of the mountain, through the Schultz fire scar, and through pockets of green trees that didn’t burn. We wind up at the maintenance cabins for the city wells in the Inner Basin, where we have a few choices. Either up the steep trail to the Inner Basin, continue up Waterline to the north side of the Peaks, or down to Lockett Meadow.

I always head up to the Inner Basin first, as that is my main goal for the ride. I’ll come back down one of the lesser known maintenance roads to the cabins, then head up Upper Waterline. The grade starts off fairly light, but the last mile before the end of the road  gets steeper. That combined with the thin air at 10,000 feet has me start thinking about the long downhill to come. Waterline Road dead ends at 10,200 feet, in Abineau Canyon, surrounded by avalanche scars, and in the shadow of the highest point in Arizona.

After butting on thicker gloves and a jacket, it’s fifteen miles of downhill back to Schultz Pass, then my choice of routes back home. Today I hooked up with the Arizona Trail, then retraced my steps back over Observatory Mesa and home.

Enough text, on to the pics, yeah?

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Mt. Elden and the Dry Lake Hills, from (almost) the bottom of Waterline Road. Usually I’m riding over there, taking pictures of over here!
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The Dragonspine.

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What I meant by “under” the Dragonspine. Choo choo!
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The aspens are growing in after the Schultz fire. Part of the recovery.

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Feeling walled in by the young aspens.

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Almost on level with Mt. Elden.
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Follow the yellow leafed road!
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I’m a little early this year. Not all the trees were changing,  but almost all of them still had leaves. It was nice to see the trees full.

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Why I do it. Fremont on the left, Agassiz on the right. Come around the corner, with these two huge peaks presented to you… it’s amazing.
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Break time! Looking back down the way I came.
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Fueling up the well pumps. The wells up here can supply up to 10% or so of Flagstaff’s water.

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Up and up, Upper Waterline Road.
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Lockett Meadow from above.
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Upper Waterline is not regularly maintained, so there are usually a few blowdowns to contend with. We’ll call this one a show stopper.
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End of the road! Looking north from ~10,200 feet.
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Looking south-ish up Abineau Canyon, at Humphrey’s Peak.
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I spent a good 5 minutes taking pictures of these two red-tails. They were having fun.
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Relaxing after playing, probably making fun of the camera guy.
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More local wildlife, spotted on the way home on the Loop Trail.

Stats for the day?

Miles ridden – 60.6

Total vertical distance – 5,280 feet (One mile!)

Total time – 9 hours

Time stopped – 2 hours 18 minutes

Crashes – 0

Flowers smelled – several

Trees hi-fived – at least 10

Campers camped in the middle of the road – 2

 

The Things You See – 4

I may or may not have been busy. Lots of trail days, the Taylor House Ride, and after spending a few days in the back country up on the North Rim with friends and taking well over a thousand pictures… the thought of going through them all to find the best ones to put up was a little daunting. Maybe I’ll do a North Rim photo dump, yeah?

Anyways… a few highlights up until a few weeks ago. More to follow when I pull it off the camera.

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Bzzzzzz…
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Wotan’s Throne, Cape Royal, North Rim of Grand Canyon.
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Sunset at Cape Royal, North Rim of Grand Canyon.
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Fire on the rim from Bright Angel Point trail, North rim of Grand Canyon.
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Agave fractal, Point Sublime, North Rim of Grand Canyon.
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Curt Walters, painting plein air at Point Sublime, North Rim of Grand Canyon. 
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One of the coolest rigs I’ve seen in a long time!

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My Favorite Time of the Year

Well, one of them, anyways.

I love storms. I’m aware that they cause a lot of problems for a lot of people, but out here in Arizona, we don’t get a heck of a lot of moisture from the sky, so I celebrate the storms. I’ll go out in them, hike, ride, work in them, and I’ll get depressed when they go away and the Sun comes back out.

Maybe I should live in Seattle.

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But does Seattle have this?

I love it when the monsoon season starts up in Flagstaff. It’s been a long stretch since the last rain, usually, and the forest is dry and thirsty. It’s hot, It’s dry. Dusty. Most years, there’s been at least one big forest fire, and countless smaller fires, usually human caused. They closed parts of the forest this year because of how dry it’s been. Usually, around the beginning of July, big thunderheads start rolling across the sky, rains, lightning and thunder, hail storms, the occasional tornado. This year? About right on time! They opened the forest this past Wednesday.

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A welcome and scary sight in the midst of a hard drought.

I like to ride up to a thunderstorm, then race it home to see if I can beat the rain. I call it storm poking. Sometimes, the storm wins. Sometimes I’m faster. I like finding a place to sit and watch and listen to the storm, too. That’s my favorite.

Today, I got wet. Very wet.

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Heavy clouds over the Peaks.

I was up on top of Mt. Elden, planning to ride down Sunset, ride some of the trail work that we did before the closure, then hook up with Little Bear, and decide where to go from there.

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Not even five minutes later.

When I saw the rain marching down the slopes of the Peaks towards Schultz Pass, I knew I was going to get wet. Fortunately I brought my rain cape! Unfortunately, rain capes are really only effective if your bike has fenders… Tri lacks the fenders.

The rain caught me on the Catwalk, and I put on the rain cape. It’s all so fun, though, I ended up spraying everything under the cape (So, me, my bike, and everything attached to it) with wet sandy mud. There were points, where the trail drainage needs work, where the water was running down the trail five or six inches deep. Lightning was striking around me, the rain was getting heavy, and I was having a blast. Not even in that retrospective “It sucked in the moment, but looking back, it was kind of fun.” way, I was genuinely enjoying it.

I opted not to go down Little Bear, because of the Schultz Fire, a lot of that trail is totally exposed, which is bad with lightning. I got down to Schultz Pass, and took the road down. As I got to the Y, the rain let up and the Sun came out. I rolled up my (now very muddy) rain cape, dumped about three cubic feet of sand out of each shoe, and headed home, the long way, enticing more storms to come and get me.

It was a great ride. But next time, I’ll bring a rain jacket, not a cape.

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Short fun section of Sunset, above the Catwalk.

I’m planning on riding tomorrow. Will I get wet? We’ll see!

Camera Play – 2

So, last week… was it last week?

*Checks*

So, last week, I put my camera on my telescope and pointed it at the sky, and put up the pictures.

A few days later, I did the same thing, because Saturn was at opposition. I actually put my telescope on Henry and rode down to the school and set up on the field, since the planets were in the trees, as seen from the backyard.

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Now, a little bit of storytime:

Mom and I both love the sky. Many nights were spent staring up, looking at stars, satellites, meteor showers, comets, and even the northern lights when they stretched down to Arizona once.

A long long time ago, my mom and I got a little telescope from Big 5, and we set it up, and looked through it pretty often. I still have it. Neither of us knew how to use it well, as evidenced by the first time looking through it, what I thought were planets was actually poorly focused glares OF the planets.

Yeah, go me.

Living in an area with no nearby trees, we had a wide open view of the sky, so we set up fairly often, and I started to get… passable at using it. Figured out the focusing, zeroed in the finder scope, learned how to use the fancy dancy equatorial mount that it came with, and we saw some cool stuff. Jupiter and its moons, the crescent of Venus, some nebulae, and of course, the moon.

Two things always eluded me, though, the Great Red Spot on Jupiter, and Saturn. The Great Red Spot, because it always was facing away from Earth every time I set up, and Saturn because… well, Saturn is hard to see. So far away and all, and our scope was not exactly a high powered scope. I either couldn’t resolve it beyond a dim yellow dot in the eyepiece, if I could even locate it in the field of vision at all at higher magnification.

Finally, a few years ago, I saw Saturn and its rings, through that same telescope. I got lucky, Saturn happened to be at opposition, there was no wind, and I saw it. A tiny golden dot with a yellow ribbon around it. I was happy, but I was at the limits of that scope’s abilities.

Then I got better lenses. A new telescope and better mount. Learned how to better use them.

I think that brings us up to current… Oh right, pictures of planets!

I saw Saturn through a telescope for the second time ever! I even took a picture of it! (Well, several….)

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After staring at Saturn for a long while, I turned to Jupiter.

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On the lower left of the disk, at the end of the band? That’s the Great Red Spot! I managed to see two of my favorite sky sights in one night!

The pictures do neither justice. I can zero in the focus perfectly for my eyes, but the camera is a lot more difficult. A dual speed focuser will help, as would setting up the mount with tracking motors to do long exposures, but we’ll see if I keep doing this. As it is now, I’m just dabbling, and I enjoy just looking just as much as taking pictures.

I’ll be doing this again, though, Mars is at opposition on the 27th!

Camera Play

Yesterday I mentioned that it’s important to look up. Not just for hanging branches, or dive-bombing birds, or attack squirrels, but because there’s a lot of scenery up there, too.

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It is no secret to anyone who knows me that I love taking pictures.  So much so, that I have a real camera with me in addition to my phone just about all the time. I don’t consider myself terribly good at it, just good enough that luck carries me the rest of the way to some good pictures. I don’t necessarily take pictures to remember scenes, I do it because I go a lot of places that people I know don’t go, and I like sharing.

As a result, I play a lot with my camera. I make it a point when I go out camping to spend some time just snapping random shots of what’s around me. When it gets dark, I’m usually spending time taking pictures of the sky. Moon, stars, planets, nothing’s safe from my lens. I’ve even caught a satellite or two.

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Tree, reaching for the Moon, as was my camera.

Astro photography is something I’ve always wanted to dip my toes into. I’ve got a good telescope and mount for it, so why not? I got a cheap t-ring for the camera, and set up in the backyard Sunday night.

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The Moon
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It almost looks like something out of a book!
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Jupiter! And if you look close, you can see four moons!

What do you think? I’d say it went rather well, for my first shot at it. Next time I’ll play with filters.

Remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Try to make sense of what you see and wonder about what makes the universe exist. Be curious.
— Stephen Hawking, 1942–2018

Meet the Bikes: I’m Henry!

Most of my bikes have been through some sort of evolution throughout their lives. That is the nature of having a thing… you start off with it, then, over the course of time, you change things, add or remove bits, modifying it to make it suit your needs. My bikes… some start off serving a specific role, but maybe that role changes. Or they start off with one set of components, then get a completely different set. Sometimes, even whole new frames.

The question could be asked “Is it still the same bike if none of the parts are the same? I say… it depends. When I name a bike, I’m naming an idea, the personality, the soul that develops around the bike. Sometimes, the name is tied to the hardware that the bike is made out of. Sometimes… it is tied to something deeper, more personal.

Out of all my bikes, no bike has changed over time as much as Henry the Packmule.

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“I’m Henry!”

Henry has existed across three bike frames and countless changes in parts. I think the only original part is the kickstand. Henry even has a history that starts before there was a bicycle named Henry, but you’ll have to ask my sister about that, she knows the story better than I. Suffice to say, she named him.

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Henry the Packmule started out as a Trek 820 frame, built up with road components from another bike, and a Surly 1×1 fork. I built my own front and rear racks, because why not? I was on a budget, and it was cheaper to build them from scratch myself.

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Original Henry in the wild.

Eventually, Henry got moved to an aluminium Giant Boulder SE frame when I noticed that the steel Trek frame had a slight bend.

Then, one day, my dream frame went on sale.

I had long drooled over the Surly Big Dummy, but man they were pricey. Worth every penny, but it took a lot of pennies to buy one. So, when Surly updated the design of the Big Dummy frame, they put the previous model on firesale. I still really didn’t have the money, but I crossed my fingers and bought it anyways.

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I think it was one of my better choices.

I built the Big Dummy frame up with mountain bike parts, used the old wheels and brakes, and built my own rack for the back. Xtracycle was having a sale on their bags, so I picked up a set of those for cheap. Many adventures were had.

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From the doomed Grand Canyon ride attempt, overlooking the Babbitt Ranch.

Eventually, I built my own wheels, installed disc brakes, put a 29 inch wheel on the front, set Henry up with the Surly Dummy Cargo Kit, and have gone back and forth endlessly with front racks and baskets.

I’ve hauled a few hundred pounds of wood home with Henry, carried other bikes, some light bike touring and camping, gone mountain biking, ridden in parades, towed (pushed) a car, and had it in the air. I’ve even brought home groceries.

Even more impressive are the bike moves with the trailer I built.

Currently, Henry is the bike that gets the most miles, partly because the platform pedals let me ride in sandals, but mostly because, for the most part, Henry is set up just about perfect for me. With a 29 inch front wheel (helps smooth out bumps, and stabilizes the bike) a 26 inch rear wheel built around a Rohloff Speedhub 500/14 internally geared hub, (the Big Dummy frame was designed with this hub in mind.) Hydraulic disc brakes keep the speed in check. (Haha!) The Dummy Cargo Kit with a few mods is the ideal setup for my needs, the bags swallow whatever I throw at them, and a homemade wide loader bar helps me cary anything big or heavy. All this rolls around on Schwalbe Big Apple tires.

And I almost forgot… Henry has the coolest horn.

Henry looks big and unwieldy, but for a packmule, he’s surprisingly quick and nimble. Sure he’s heavy, but he rolls fast and smooth, even with a load. Once you’re moving, you don’t feel the weight. And once you get used to the long wheelbase, he’s a surprisingly capable mountain bike, too.

I feel like this is turning into a long term review…

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Henry and Two-Spot

So, what’s left to change on Henry? Well… not a whole lot. I like Henry, even after all these years, as he rolls now, Henry is still my dream bike. Getting on Henry is like putting on your favorite old jacket.

I guess that’s another part of having a thing. You make changes to it over time, and if you stick with it, eventually, you make it perfect for you.

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The Dummies, catching some sun.

I hope you enjoyed reading about Henry the Packmule. This took a while to write, as Henry has the most history behind him, even though he’s not the oldest bike in the garage. I know I had fun remembering, going back and reading and looking for old pictures, and re-living some of the old memories with Henry.

Take it easy.

That thing electric? ~ The majority of people who come up to me as I’m strapping down an impressive load to Henry